Two decades of trends in ground water chemical composition in The Great Vasyugan Mire, Western Siberia, Russia

Yoram Eckstein, Oleg G. Savichev, Elena Yu Pasechnik

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

9 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Boreal wetlands cover approximately 30 % of the West Siberian Plain (WSP). The Great Vasyugan Mire, Northern Hemisphere’s largest contiguous wetlands, occupies low-lying plains in the Ob and Irtysh’s interfluve. Most research has investigated the peat generating processes and reserves in the WSP wetlands. Little information exists about temporal changes in the chemical composition of the wetland waters within the Ob–Irtysh interfluve. Although the region’s climate is continental with extended cold winters and short hot summers, Western Siberia is experiencing rapid climatic changes. The consequences of these changes include permafrost loss, snow cover reduction, and river flow changes. In this study whether and how increasing surface air temperatures contributed to changes in the chemical composition of the atmospheric precipitation and water in the mire were investigated. Time-series analysis and multivariate statistics on the hydrochemical data collected between 1994 and 2013 at several sampling sites were used to evaluate the statistical significance of the possible correlations between the increasing surface air temperatures and various chemical constituents in the precipitation and the wetland water.

Original languageEnglish
Article number48
Pages (from-to)7329-7341
Number of pages13
JournalEnvironmental Earth Sciences
Volume73
Issue number11
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 22 Jun 2015

Fingerprint

mire
Siberia
Wetlands
Russia
Groundwater
groundwater
wetlands
chemical composition
wetland
Chemical analysis
surface temperature
Water
air temperature
atmospheric precipitation
Permafrost
Time series analysis
Peat
permafrost
snowpack
time series analysis

Keywords

  • Boreal wetland
  • Climate change
  • Russia
  • Water chemical composition
  • Western Siberia

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Soil Science
  • Environmental Chemistry
  • Water Science and Technology
  • Pollution
  • Global and Planetary Change
  • Geology
  • Earth-Surface Processes

Cite this

Two decades of trends in ground water chemical composition in The Great Vasyugan Mire, Western Siberia, Russia. / Eckstein, Yoram; Savichev, Oleg G.; Pasechnik, Elena Yu.

In: Environmental Earth Sciences, Vol. 73, No. 11, 48, 22.06.2015, p. 7329-7341.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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