The formation of gradient submicrocrystalline structure at nickel surface layers under ultrasonic impact treatment

V. Panin, P. Kuznetsov, Yu Pochivalov, I. Belyaeva, T. Rakhmatulina, D. Shumakova

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Abstract

Submicrocrystalline nickel produced by ultrasonic impact treatment was studied using scanning tunnel and optical microscopy. The size and grain boundary energy distributions were obtained depending on the distance from surface. It was found that regardless of processing mode ultrasonic impact treatment led to refinement of the thin surface layer comparable with initial grain size. Analysis of cumulative distribution functions for relative boundary energy allows us to study energy redistribution under treatment and qualitatively estimate low-angle and high-angle boundaries contributions.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationAdvanced Materials with Hierarchical Structure for New Technologies and Reliable Structures
PublisherAmerican Institute of Physics Inc.
Volume1683
ISBN (Electronic)9780735413306
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 27 Oct 2015
EventInternational Conference on Advanced Materials with Hierarchical Structure for New Technologies and Reliable Structures 2015 - Tomsk, Russian Federation
Duration: 21 Sep 201525 Sep 2015

Conference

ConferenceInternational Conference on Advanced Materials with Hierarchical Structure for New Technologies and Reliable Structures 2015
CountryRussian Federation
CityTomsk
Period21.9.1525.9.15

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Keywords

  • cumulative distribution function
  • Gradient structure
  • scanning tunnel microscopy
  • ultrasonic impact treatment

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Physics and Astronomy(all)

Cite this

Panin, V., Kuznetsov, P., Pochivalov, Y., Belyaeva, I., Rakhmatulina, T., & Shumakova, D. (2015). The formation of gradient submicrocrystalline structure at nickel surface layers under ultrasonic impact treatment. In Advanced Materials with Hierarchical Structure for New Technologies and Reliable Structures (Vol. 1683). [020176] American Institute of Physics Inc.. https://doi.org/10.1063/1.4932866