Suppression of the Thermal Decomposition Reaction of Forest Combustible Materials in Large-Area Fires

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5 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Experimental investigations on the characteristic time of suppression of the thermal decomposition reaction of typical forest combustible materials (aspen twigs, birch leaves, spruce needles, pine chips, and a mixture of these materials) and the volume of water required for this purpose have been performed for model fire hotbeds of different areas: SFCM = 0.0003–0.007 m2 and SFCM = 0.045–0.245 m2. In the experiments, aerosol water flows with droplets of size 0.01–0.25 mm were used for the spraying of model fire hotbeds, and the density of spraying was 0.02 L/(m2·s). It was established that the characteristics of suppression of a fire by an aerosol water flow are mainly determined by the sizes of the droplets in this flow. Prognostic estimates of changes in the dispersivity of a droplet cloud, formed from large (as large as 0.5 L) "drops" (water agglomerates) thrown down from a height, have been made. It is shown that these changes can influence the conditions and characteristics of suppression of a forest fire. Dependences, allowing one to forecast the characteristics of suppression of the thermal decomposition of forest combustible materials with the use of large water agglomerates thrown down from an aircraft and aerosol clouds formed from these agglomerates in the process of their movement to the earth, are presented.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)411-419
Number of pages9
JournalJournal of Engineering Physics and Thermophysics
Volume91
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Mar 2018

Keywords

  • aerosol flow
  • forest combustible materials
  • hotbed of fire
  • thermal decomposition
  • water mass

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Condensed Matter Physics
  • Engineering(all)

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