Stabilization of primary mobile radiation defects in MgF2 crystals

V. M. Lisitsyn, L. A. Lisitsyna, A. I. Popov, E. A. Kotomin, F. U. Abuova, A. Akilbekov, J. Maier

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

7 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Non-radiative decay of the electronic excitations (excitons) into point defects (F-H pairs of Frenkel defects) is main radiation damage mechanism in many ionic (halide) solids. Typical time scale of the relaxation of the electronic excitation into a primary, short-lived defect pair is about 1-50 ps with the quantum yield up to 0.2-0.8. However, only a small fraction of these primary defects are spatially separated and survive after transformation into stable, long-lived defects. The survival probability (or stable defect accumulation efficiency) can differ by orders of magnitude, dependent on the material type; e.g. ∼10% in alkali halides with f.c.c. or b.c.c. structure, 0.1% in rutile MgF2 and <0.001% in fluorides MeF2 (Me: Ca, Sr, Ba). The key factor determining accumulation of stable radiation defects is stabilization of primary defects, first of all, highly mobile hole H centers, through their transformation into more complex immobile defects. In this talk, we present the results of theoretical calculations of the migration energies of the F and H centers in poorely studied MgF2 crystals with a focus on the H center stabilization in the form of the interstitial F2 molecules which is supported by presented experimental data.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)24-28
Number of pages5
JournalNuclear Instruments and Methods in Physics Research, Section B: Beam Interactions with Materials and Atoms
Volume374
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 May 2016

Fingerprint

Stabilization
stabilization
Radiation
Defects
Crystals
defects
radiation
crystals
Frenkel defects
Alkali halides
alkali halides
color centers
radiation damage
electronics
Radiation damage
rutile
Quantum yield
point defects
Point defects
excitation

Keywords

  • Excitons
  • First principles calculations
  • H and F centers
  • Radiation defects
  • Rutile MgF

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Nuclear and High Energy Physics
  • Instrumentation

Cite this

Stabilization of primary mobile radiation defects in MgF2 crystals. / Lisitsyn, V. M.; Lisitsyna, L. A.; Popov, A. I.; Kotomin, E. A.; Abuova, F. U.; Akilbekov, A.; Maier, J.

In: Nuclear Instruments and Methods in Physics Research, Section B: Beam Interactions with Materials and Atoms, Vol. 374, 01.05.2016, p. 24-28.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Lisitsyn, V. M. ; Lisitsyna, L. A. ; Popov, A. I. ; Kotomin, E. A. ; Abuova, F. U. ; Akilbekov, A. ; Maier, J. / Stabilization of primary mobile radiation defects in MgF2 crystals. In: Nuclear Instruments and Methods in Physics Research, Section B: Beam Interactions with Materials and Atoms. 2016 ; Vol. 374. pp. 24-28.
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