Polylactic acid nano- and microchamber arrays for encapsulation of small hydrophilic molecules featuring drug release via high intensity focused ultrasound

Meiyu Gai, Johannes Frueh, Tianyi Tao, Arseniy V. Petrov, Vladimir V. Petrov, Evgeniy V. Shesterikov, Sergei I. Tverdokhlebov, Gleb B. Sukhorukov

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

16 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Long term encapsulation combined with spatiotemporal release for a precisely defined quantity of small hydrophilic molecules on demand remains a challenge in various fields ranging from medical drug delivery, controlled release of catalysts to industrial anti-corrosion systems. Free-standing individually sealed polylactic acid (PLA) nano- and microchamber arrays were produced by one-step dip-coating a PDMS stamp into PLA solution for 5 s followed by drying under ambient conditions. The wall thickness of these hydrophobic nano-microchambers is tunable from 150 nm to 7 μm by varying the PLA solution concentration. Furthermore, small hydrophilic molecules were successfully in situ precipitated within individual microchambers in the course of solvent evaporation after sonicating the PLA@PDMS stamp to remove air-bubbles and to load the active substance containing solvent. The cargo capacity of single chambers was determined to be in the range of several picograms, while it amounts to several micrograms per cm2. Two different methods for sealing chambers were compared: microcontact printing versus dip-coating whereby microcontact printing onto a flat PLA sheet allows for entrapment of micro-air-bubbles enabling microchambers with both ultrasound responsiveness and reduced permeability. Cargo release triggered by external high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) stimuli is demonstrated by experiment and compared with numerical simulations.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)7063-7070
Number of pages8
JournalNanoscale
Volume9
Issue number21
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 7 Jun 2017

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Encapsulation
Ultrasonics
Molecules
Acids
Pharmaceutical Preparations
Printing
Controlled drug delivery
Coatings
Air
Drying
Evaporation
poly(lactic acid)
Corrosion
Catalysts
Computer simulation
Experiments

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Materials Science(all)

Cite this

Polylactic acid nano- and microchamber arrays for encapsulation of small hydrophilic molecules featuring drug release via high intensity focused ultrasound. / Gai, Meiyu; Frueh, Johannes; Tao, Tianyi; Petrov, Arseniy V.; Petrov, Vladimir V.; Shesterikov, Evgeniy V.; Tverdokhlebov, Sergei I.; Sukhorukov, Gleb B.

In: Nanoscale, Vol. 9, No. 21, 07.06.2017, p. 7063-7070.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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