Long-term intermittent hypoxia in mice: Protracted hypersomnolence with oxidative injury to sleep-wake brain regions

Sigrid Carlen Veasey, Christine W. Davis, Polina Fenik, Guanxia Zhan, Yeou Jey Hsu, Domenico Pratico, Andrew Gow

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

248 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Study Objectives: This study was designed to test the hypothesis that long-term intermittent hypoxia (LTIH), modeling the hypoxia-reoxygenation events of sleep apnea, results in oxidative neural injury, including wake-promoting neural groups, and that this injury contributes to residual impaired maintenance of wakefulness. Design: Sleep times and oxidative-injury parameters were compared for mice exposed to LTIH and mice exposed to sham LTIH. Subjects: Adult male C57BL/6J mice were studied. Interventions: Mice were exposed to LTIH or sham LTIH in the lights-on period daily for 8 weeks. Electrophysiologic sleep-wake recordings and oxidative-injury measures were performed either immediately or 2 weeks following LTIH exposures. Measurements and Results: At both intervals, total sleep time per 24 hours in LTIH-exposed mice was increased by more than 2 hours, (P2α-VI, 22%, P

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)194-201
Number of pages8
JournalSleep
Volume27
Issue number2
Publication statusPublished - 2004
Externally publishedYes

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Disorders of Excessive Somnolence
Sleep
Wounds and Injuries
Brain
Hypoxia
Wakefulness
Sleep Apnea Syndromes
Inbred C57BL Mouse
Maintenance
Light

Keywords

  • Apnea
  • Hypoxia
  • Oxidation
  • Oxidative stress
  • Wakefulness

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Physiology

Cite this

Veasey, S. C., Davis, C. W., Fenik, P., Zhan, G., Hsu, Y. J., Pratico, D., & Gow, A. (2004). Long-term intermittent hypoxia in mice: Protracted hypersomnolence with oxidative injury to sleep-wake brain regions. Sleep, 27(2), 194-201.

Long-term intermittent hypoxia in mice : Protracted hypersomnolence with oxidative injury to sleep-wake brain regions. / Veasey, Sigrid Carlen; Davis, Christine W.; Fenik, Polina; Zhan, Guanxia; Hsu, Yeou Jey; Pratico, Domenico; Gow, Andrew.

In: Sleep, Vol. 27, No. 2, 2004, p. 194-201.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Veasey, SC, Davis, CW, Fenik, P, Zhan, G, Hsu, YJ, Pratico, D & Gow, A 2004, 'Long-term intermittent hypoxia in mice: Protracted hypersomnolence with oxidative injury to sleep-wake brain regions', Sleep, vol. 27, no. 2, pp. 194-201.
Veasey SC, Davis CW, Fenik P, Zhan G, Hsu YJ, Pratico D et al. Long-term intermittent hypoxia in mice: Protracted hypersomnolence with oxidative injury to sleep-wake brain regions. Sleep. 2004;27(2):194-201.
Veasey, Sigrid Carlen ; Davis, Christine W. ; Fenik, Polina ; Zhan, Guanxia ; Hsu, Yeou Jey ; Pratico, Domenico ; Gow, Andrew. / Long-term intermittent hypoxia in mice : Protracted hypersomnolence with oxidative injury to sleep-wake brain regions. In: Sleep. 2004 ; Vol. 27, No. 2. pp. 194-201.
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