IR reflectography and active thermography on artworks

The added value of the 1.5-3 μm band

Jeroen Peeters, Geert Van der Snickt, Stefano Sfarra, Stijn Legrand, Clemente Ibarra-Castanedo, Koen Janssens, Gunther Steenackers

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Infrared Radiation (IR) artwork inspection is typically performed through active thermography and reflectography with different setups and cameras. While Infrared Radiation Reflectography (IRR) is an established technique in the museum field, exploiting mainly the IR-A (0.7-1.4 μm) band to probe for hidden layers and modifications within the paint stratigraphy system, active thermography operating in the IR-C range (3-5 μm) is less frequently employed with the aim to visualize structural defects and features deeper inside the build-up. In this work, we assess to which extent the less investigated IR-B band (1.5-3 μm) can combine the information obtained from both setups. The application of IR-B systems is relatively rare as there are only a limited amount of commercial systems available due to the technical complexity of the lens coating. This is mainly added as a so-called broadband option on regular Mid-wave infrared radiation (MWIR) (IR-C'/3-5 μm) cameras to increase sensitivity for high temperature applications in industry. In particular, four objects were studied in both reflectographic and thermographic mode in the IR-B spectral range and their results benchmarked with IR-A and IR-C images. For multispectral application, a single benchmark is made with macroscopic reflection mode Fourier transform infrared (MA-rFTIR) results. IR-B proved valuable for visualisation of underdrawings, pencil marks, canvas fibres and wooden grain structures and potential pathways for additional applications such as pigment identification in multispectral mode or characterization of the support (panels, canvas) are indicated.

Original languageEnglish
Article number50
JournalApplied Sciences (Switzerland)
Volume8
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Jan 2018

Fingerprint

infrared radiation
Infrared radiation
cameras
Cameras
museums
Stratigraphy
stratigraphy
High temperature applications
paints
Crystal microstructure
Museums
pigments
Pigments
Paint
inspection
Lenses
Fourier transforms
industries
lenses
Visualization

Keywords

  • Active thermography
  • Artwork inspection
  • IR reflectography
  • MA-rFTIR

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Materials Science(all)
  • Instrumentation
  • Engineering(all)
  • Process Chemistry and Technology
  • Computer Science Applications
  • Fluid Flow and Transfer Processes

Cite this

Peeters, J., Van der Snickt, G., Sfarra, S., Legrand, S., Ibarra-Castanedo, C., Janssens, K., & Steenackers, G. (2018). IR reflectography and active thermography on artworks: The added value of the 1.5-3 μm band. Applied Sciences (Switzerland), 8(1), [50]. https://doi.org/10.3390/app8010050

IR reflectography and active thermography on artworks : The added value of the 1.5-3 μm band. / Peeters, Jeroen; Van der Snickt, Geert; Sfarra, Stefano; Legrand, Stijn; Ibarra-Castanedo, Clemente; Janssens, Koen; Steenackers, Gunther.

In: Applied Sciences (Switzerland), Vol. 8, No. 1, 50, 01.01.2018.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Peeters, J, Van der Snickt, G, Sfarra, S, Legrand, S, Ibarra-Castanedo, C, Janssens, K & Steenackers, G 2018, 'IR reflectography and active thermography on artworks: The added value of the 1.5-3 μm band', Applied Sciences (Switzerland), vol. 8, no. 1, 50. https://doi.org/10.3390/app8010050
Peeters, Jeroen ; Van der Snickt, Geert ; Sfarra, Stefano ; Legrand, Stijn ; Ibarra-Castanedo, Clemente ; Janssens, Koen ; Steenackers, Gunther. / IR reflectography and active thermography on artworks : The added value of the 1.5-3 μm band. In: Applied Sciences (Switzerland). 2018 ; Vol. 8, No. 1.
@article{0264e846c2b649b48fd31f0cf7280aeb,
title = "IR reflectography and active thermography on artworks: The added value of the 1.5-3 μm band",
abstract = "Infrared Radiation (IR) artwork inspection is typically performed through active thermography and reflectography with different setups and cameras. While Infrared Radiation Reflectography (IRR) is an established technique in the museum field, exploiting mainly the IR-A (0.7-1.4 μm) band to probe for hidden layers and modifications within the paint stratigraphy system, active thermography operating in the IR-C range (3-5 μm) is less frequently employed with the aim to visualize structural defects and features deeper inside the build-up. In this work, we assess to which extent the less investigated IR-B band (1.5-3 μm) can combine the information obtained from both setups. The application of IR-B systems is relatively rare as there are only a limited amount of commercial systems available due to the technical complexity of the lens coating. This is mainly added as a so-called broadband option on regular Mid-wave infrared radiation (MWIR) (IR-C'/3-5 μm) cameras to increase sensitivity for high temperature applications in industry. In particular, four objects were studied in both reflectographic and thermographic mode in the IR-B spectral range and their results benchmarked with IR-A and IR-C images. For multispectral application, a single benchmark is made with macroscopic reflection mode Fourier transform infrared (MA-rFTIR) results. IR-B proved valuable for visualisation of underdrawings, pencil marks, canvas fibres and wooden grain structures and potential pathways for additional applications such as pigment identification in multispectral mode or characterization of the support (panels, canvas) are indicated.",
keywords = "Active thermography, Artwork inspection, IR reflectography, MA-rFTIR",
author = "Jeroen Peeters and {Van der Snickt}, Geert and Stefano Sfarra and Stijn Legrand and Clemente Ibarra-Castanedo and Koen Janssens and Gunther Steenackers",
year = "2018",
month = "1",
day = "1",
doi = "10.3390/app8010050",
language = "English",
volume = "8",
journal = "Applied Sciences (Switzerland)",
issn = "2076-3417",
publisher = "Multidisciplinary Digital Publishing Institute (MDPI)",
number = "1",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - IR reflectography and active thermography on artworks

T2 - The added value of the 1.5-3 μm band

AU - Peeters, Jeroen

AU - Van der Snickt, Geert

AU - Sfarra, Stefano

AU - Legrand, Stijn

AU - Ibarra-Castanedo, Clemente

AU - Janssens, Koen

AU - Steenackers, Gunther

PY - 2018/1/1

Y1 - 2018/1/1

N2 - Infrared Radiation (IR) artwork inspection is typically performed through active thermography and reflectography with different setups and cameras. While Infrared Radiation Reflectography (IRR) is an established technique in the museum field, exploiting mainly the IR-A (0.7-1.4 μm) band to probe for hidden layers and modifications within the paint stratigraphy system, active thermography operating in the IR-C range (3-5 μm) is less frequently employed with the aim to visualize structural defects and features deeper inside the build-up. In this work, we assess to which extent the less investigated IR-B band (1.5-3 μm) can combine the information obtained from both setups. The application of IR-B systems is relatively rare as there are only a limited amount of commercial systems available due to the technical complexity of the lens coating. This is mainly added as a so-called broadband option on regular Mid-wave infrared radiation (MWIR) (IR-C'/3-5 μm) cameras to increase sensitivity for high temperature applications in industry. In particular, four objects were studied in both reflectographic and thermographic mode in the IR-B spectral range and their results benchmarked with IR-A and IR-C images. For multispectral application, a single benchmark is made with macroscopic reflection mode Fourier transform infrared (MA-rFTIR) results. IR-B proved valuable for visualisation of underdrawings, pencil marks, canvas fibres and wooden grain structures and potential pathways for additional applications such as pigment identification in multispectral mode or characterization of the support (panels, canvas) are indicated.

AB - Infrared Radiation (IR) artwork inspection is typically performed through active thermography and reflectography with different setups and cameras. While Infrared Radiation Reflectography (IRR) is an established technique in the museum field, exploiting mainly the IR-A (0.7-1.4 μm) band to probe for hidden layers and modifications within the paint stratigraphy system, active thermography operating in the IR-C range (3-5 μm) is less frequently employed with the aim to visualize structural defects and features deeper inside the build-up. In this work, we assess to which extent the less investigated IR-B band (1.5-3 μm) can combine the information obtained from both setups. The application of IR-B systems is relatively rare as there are only a limited amount of commercial systems available due to the technical complexity of the lens coating. This is mainly added as a so-called broadband option on regular Mid-wave infrared radiation (MWIR) (IR-C'/3-5 μm) cameras to increase sensitivity for high temperature applications in industry. In particular, four objects were studied in both reflectographic and thermographic mode in the IR-B spectral range and their results benchmarked with IR-A and IR-C images. For multispectral application, a single benchmark is made with macroscopic reflection mode Fourier transform infrared (MA-rFTIR) results. IR-B proved valuable for visualisation of underdrawings, pencil marks, canvas fibres and wooden grain structures and potential pathways for additional applications such as pigment identification in multispectral mode or characterization of the support (panels, canvas) are indicated.

KW - Active thermography

KW - Artwork inspection

KW - IR reflectography

KW - MA-rFTIR

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85039963774&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=85039963774&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.3390/app8010050

DO - 10.3390/app8010050

M3 - Article

VL - 8

JO - Applied Sciences (Switzerland)

JF - Applied Sciences (Switzerland)

SN - 2076-3417

IS - 1

M1 - 50

ER -