Intermittent versus constant aerobic exercise

Effects on arterial stiffness

Nicolas Tordi, Laurent Mourot, Eglantine Colin, Jacques Regnard

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

32 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Aerobic exercises (of sufficient duration and intensity) decreases arterial stiffness. However, the direct relationship between the type of aerobic exercise (i.e. constant versus interval) and the alteration in arterial stiffness has been poorly explored. We evaluated the hemodynamic responses of 11 healthy males (22.5 ± 0.7 years, height 177.7 ± 1.1 cm, body mass 70.5 ± 2.4 kg) following acute constant (CE) and intermittent cycling exercise (IE). Exercise duration and intensity (mean heart rate) were matched during both exercises (142.9 ± 2.4 bpm for CE and 144.2 ± 2.4 bpm for IE). Heart rate (HR) and cardiac output (CO) were measured throughout the whole session, while blood pressure and pulse wave velocity (PWV) were measured during pre exercise and 30 min recovery. Arterial stiffness and cardiac autonomic control were assessed through PWV and heart rate variability, respectively. After IE, lower limb arterial stiffness was significantly and steadily decreased compared to pre exercise value (from 8.6 ± 0.1 to m s-1 to 7.6 ± 0.3 to m s-1 at 30 min) and was lower than after CE (8.2 ± 0.3 m s-1 at 30 min, which did not significantly change compared to pre exercise: 8.7 ± 0.2 m s -1). We hypothesized that the higher HR and lower arterial stiffness after IE were likely due to variations in peripheral vascular changes during the exercise which may trigger the release of endothelial or metabolic vasoactive factors. These data appear to show that IE may result in a greater stimulus for vascular adaptations when compared to CE.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)801-809
Number of pages9
JournalEuropean Journal of Applied Physiology
Volume108
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Mar 2010
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Vascular Stiffness
Exercise
Heart Rate
Pulse Wave Analysis
Blood Vessels
Cardiac Output
Lower Extremity
Hemodynamics
Blood Pressure

Keywords

  • Arterial compliance
  • Arterial stiffness
  • Constant and interval exercise
  • Exercise recovery
  • Pulse wave velocity

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Orthopedics and Sports Medicine
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Physiology (medical)

Cite this

Intermittent versus constant aerobic exercise : Effects on arterial stiffness. / Tordi, Nicolas; Mourot, Laurent; Colin, Eglantine; Regnard, Jacques.

In: European Journal of Applied Physiology, Vol. 108, No. 4, 01.03.2010, p. 801-809.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Tordi, Nicolas ; Mourot, Laurent ; Colin, Eglantine ; Regnard, Jacques. / Intermittent versus constant aerobic exercise : Effects on arterial stiffness. In: European Journal of Applied Physiology. 2010 ; Vol. 108, No. 4. pp. 801-809.
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