Increased mycelial biomass production by Lentinula edodes intermittently illuminated by green light emitting diodes

Lubov B. Glukhova, Ludmila O. Sokolyanskaya, Evgeny V. Plotnikov, Anna L. Gerasimchuk, Olga V. Karnachuk, Marc Solioz, Raisa A. Karnachuk

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Fungi possess a range of light receptors to regulate metabolism and differentiation. To study the effect of light on Lentinula edodes (the shiitake mushroom), mycelial cultures were exposed to blue, green, and red fluorescent lights and light-emitting diodes, as well as green laser light. Biomass production, morphology, and pigment production were evaluated. Exposure to green light at intervals of 1 min/d at 0.4 W/m2 stimulated biomass production by 50–100 %, depending on the light source. Light intensities in excess of 1.8 W/m2 or illumination longer than 30 min/d did not affect biomass production. Carotenoid production and morphology remained unaltered during increased biomass production. These observations provide a cornerstone to the study of photoreception by this important fungus.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)2283-2289
Number of pages7
JournalBiotechnology Letters
Volume36
Issue number11
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2014

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Shiitake Mushrooms
Methyl Green
Biomass
Light emitting diodes
Light
Fungi
Carotenoids
Lighting
Metabolism
Pigments
Light sources
Lasers

Keywords

  • Fungal biomass
  • Green light
  • Hyphal morphology
  • Intermittent illumination
  • Lentinula edodes
  • Phototropism
  • Shiitake mushroom

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biotechnology

Cite this

Glukhova, L. B., Sokolyanskaya, L. O., Plotnikov, E. V., Gerasimchuk, A. L., Karnachuk, O. V., Solioz, M., & Karnachuk, R. A. (2014). Increased mycelial biomass production by Lentinula edodes intermittently illuminated by green light emitting diodes. Biotechnology Letters, 36(11), 2283-2289. https://doi.org/10.1007/s10529-014-1605-3

Increased mycelial biomass production by Lentinula edodes intermittently illuminated by green light emitting diodes. / Glukhova, Lubov B.; Sokolyanskaya, Ludmila O.; Plotnikov, Evgeny V.; Gerasimchuk, Anna L.; Karnachuk, Olga V.; Solioz, Marc; Karnachuk, Raisa A.

In: Biotechnology Letters, Vol. 36, No. 11, 2014, p. 2283-2289.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Glukhova, LB, Sokolyanskaya, LO, Plotnikov, EV, Gerasimchuk, AL, Karnachuk, OV, Solioz, M & Karnachuk, RA 2014, 'Increased mycelial biomass production by Lentinula edodes intermittently illuminated by green light emitting diodes', Biotechnology Letters, vol. 36, no. 11, pp. 2283-2289. https://doi.org/10.1007/s10529-014-1605-3
Glukhova, Lubov B. ; Sokolyanskaya, Ludmila O. ; Plotnikov, Evgeny V. ; Gerasimchuk, Anna L. ; Karnachuk, Olga V. ; Solioz, Marc ; Karnachuk, Raisa A. / Increased mycelial biomass production by Lentinula edodes intermittently illuminated by green light emitting diodes. In: Biotechnology Letters. 2014 ; Vol. 36, No. 11. pp. 2283-2289.
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