Energy loss due to eddy current in linear transformer driver cores

A. A. Kim, M. G. Mazarakis, V. I. Manylov, V. A. Vizir, W. A. Stygar

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    32 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    In linear transformer drivers as well as any other linear induction accelerator cavities, ferromagnetic cores are used to prevent the current from flowing along the induction cavity walls which are in parallel with the load. But if the core is made of conductive material, the applied voltage pulse generates the eddy current in the core itself which heats the core and therefore also reduces the overall linear transformer driver (LTD) efficiency. The energy loss due to generation of the eddy current in the cores depends on the specific resistivity of the core material, the design of the core, as well as on the distribution of the eddy current in the core tape during the remagnetizing process. In this paper we investigate how the eddy current is distributed in a core tape with an arbitrary shape hysteresis loop. Our model is based on the textbook knowledge related to the eddy current generation in ferromagnetics with rectangular hysteresis loop, and in usual conductors. For the reader's convenience, we reproduce some most important details of this knowledge in our paper. The model predicts that the same core would behave differently depending on how fast the applied voltage pulse is: in the high frequency limit, the equivalent resistance of the core reduces during the pulse whereas in the low frequency limit it is constant. An important inference is that the energy loss due to the eddy current generation can be reduced by increasing the cross section of the core over the minimum value which is required to avoid its saturation. The conclusions of the model are confirmed with experimental observations presented at the end of the paper.

    Original languageEnglish
    Article number070401
    JournalPhysical Review Special Topics - Accelerators and Beams
    Volume13
    Issue number7
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 2 Jul 2010

    Fingerprint

    eddy currents
    transformers
    energy dissipation
    tapes
    induction
    pulses
    hysteresis
    textbooks
    cavities
    electric potential
    readers
    inference
    accelerators
    conductors
    low frequencies
    saturation
    heat
    electrical resistivity

    ASJC Scopus subject areas

    • Physics and Astronomy (miscellaneous)
    • Surfaces and Interfaces
    • Nuclear and High Energy Physics

    Cite this

    Energy loss due to eddy current in linear transformer driver cores. / Kim, A. A.; Mazarakis, M. G.; Manylov, V. I.; Vizir, V. A.; Stygar, W. A.

    In: Physical Review Special Topics - Accelerators and Beams, Vol. 13, No. 7, 070401, 02.07.2010.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    Kim, A. A. ; Mazarakis, M. G. ; Manylov, V. I. ; Vizir, V. A. ; Stygar, W. A. / Energy loss due to eddy current in linear transformer driver cores. In: Physical Review Special Topics - Accelerators and Beams. 2010 ; Vol. 13, No. 7.
    @article{1e622aaa3f534856b37e1719ac23008c,
    title = "Energy loss due to eddy current in linear transformer driver cores",
    abstract = "In linear transformer drivers as well as any other linear induction accelerator cavities, ferromagnetic cores are used to prevent the current from flowing along the induction cavity walls which are in parallel with the load. But if the core is made of conductive material, the applied voltage pulse generates the eddy current in the core itself which heats the core and therefore also reduces the overall linear transformer driver (LTD) efficiency. The energy loss due to generation of the eddy current in the cores depends on the specific resistivity of the core material, the design of the core, as well as on the distribution of the eddy current in the core tape during the remagnetizing process. In this paper we investigate how the eddy current is distributed in a core tape with an arbitrary shape hysteresis loop. Our model is based on the textbook knowledge related to the eddy current generation in ferromagnetics with rectangular hysteresis loop, and in usual conductors. For the reader's convenience, we reproduce some most important details of this knowledge in our paper. The model predicts that the same core would behave differently depending on how fast the applied voltage pulse is: in the high frequency limit, the equivalent resistance of the core reduces during the pulse whereas in the low frequency limit it is constant. An important inference is that the energy loss due to the eddy current generation can be reduced by increasing the cross section of the core over the minimum value which is required to avoid its saturation. The conclusions of the model are confirmed with experimental observations presented at the end of the paper.",
    author = "Kim, {A. A.} and Mazarakis, {M. G.} and Manylov, {V. I.} and Vizir, {V. A.} and Stygar, {W. A.}",
    year = "2010",
    month = "7",
    day = "2",
    doi = "10.1103/PhysRevSTAB.13.070401",
    language = "English",
    volume = "13",
    journal = "Physical Review Special Topics - Accelerators and Beams",
    issn = "1098-4402",
    publisher = "American Physical Society",
    number = "7",

    }

    TY - JOUR

    T1 - Energy loss due to eddy current in linear transformer driver cores

    AU - Kim, A. A.

    AU - Mazarakis, M. G.

    AU - Manylov, V. I.

    AU - Vizir, V. A.

    AU - Stygar, W. A.

    PY - 2010/7/2

    Y1 - 2010/7/2

    N2 - In linear transformer drivers as well as any other linear induction accelerator cavities, ferromagnetic cores are used to prevent the current from flowing along the induction cavity walls which are in parallel with the load. But if the core is made of conductive material, the applied voltage pulse generates the eddy current in the core itself which heats the core and therefore also reduces the overall linear transformer driver (LTD) efficiency. The energy loss due to generation of the eddy current in the cores depends on the specific resistivity of the core material, the design of the core, as well as on the distribution of the eddy current in the core tape during the remagnetizing process. In this paper we investigate how the eddy current is distributed in a core tape with an arbitrary shape hysteresis loop. Our model is based on the textbook knowledge related to the eddy current generation in ferromagnetics with rectangular hysteresis loop, and in usual conductors. For the reader's convenience, we reproduce some most important details of this knowledge in our paper. The model predicts that the same core would behave differently depending on how fast the applied voltage pulse is: in the high frequency limit, the equivalent resistance of the core reduces during the pulse whereas in the low frequency limit it is constant. An important inference is that the energy loss due to the eddy current generation can be reduced by increasing the cross section of the core over the minimum value which is required to avoid its saturation. The conclusions of the model are confirmed with experimental observations presented at the end of the paper.

    AB - In linear transformer drivers as well as any other linear induction accelerator cavities, ferromagnetic cores are used to prevent the current from flowing along the induction cavity walls which are in parallel with the load. But if the core is made of conductive material, the applied voltage pulse generates the eddy current in the core itself which heats the core and therefore also reduces the overall linear transformer driver (LTD) efficiency. The energy loss due to generation of the eddy current in the cores depends on the specific resistivity of the core material, the design of the core, as well as on the distribution of the eddy current in the core tape during the remagnetizing process. In this paper we investigate how the eddy current is distributed in a core tape with an arbitrary shape hysteresis loop. Our model is based on the textbook knowledge related to the eddy current generation in ferromagnetics with rectangular hysteresis loop, and in usual conductors. For the reader's convenience, we reproduce some most important details of this knowledge in our paper. The model predicts that the same core would behave differently depending on how fast the applied voltage pulse is: in the high frequency limit, the equivalent resistance of the core reduces during the pulse whereas in the low frequency limit it is constant. An important inference is that the energy loss due to the eddy current generation can be reduced by increasing the cross section of the core over the minimum value which is required to avoid its saturation. The conclusions of the model are confirmed with experimental observations presented at the end of the paper.

    UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=77955107035&partnerID=8YFLogxK

    UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=77955107035&partnerID=8YFLogxK

    U2 - 10.1103/PhysRevSTAB.13.070401

    DO - 10.1103/PhysRevSTAB.13.070401

    M3 - Article

    AN - SCOPUS:77955107035

    VL - 13

    JO - Physical Review Special Topics - Accelerators and Beams

    JF - Physical Review Special Topics - Accelerators and Beams

    SN - 1098-4402

    IS - 7

    M1 - 070401

    ER -