Does Characterizing Global Running Pattern Help to Prescribe Individualized Strength Training in Recreational Runners?

Aurélien Patoz, Bastiaan Breine, Adrien Thouvenot, Laurent Mourot, Cyrille Gindre, Thibault Lussiana

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

This study aimed to determine if concurrent endurance and strength training that matches the global running pattern would be more effective in increasing running economy (RE) than non-matched training. The global running pattern of 37 recreational runners was determined using the Volodalen® method as being aerial (AER) or terrestrial (TER). Strength training consisted of endurance running training and either plyometric (PLY) or dynamic weight training (DWT). Runners were randomly assigned to a matched (n = 18; DWT for TER, PLY for AER) or non-matched (n = 19; DWT for AER, PLY for TER) 8 weeks concurrent training program. RE, maximal oxygen uptake V̇O2max) and peak treadmill speed at V̇O2max (PTS) were measured before and after the training intervention. None of the tested performance related variables depicted a significant group effect or interaction effect between training and grouping (p ≥ 0.436). However, a significant increase in RE, V̇O2max, and PTS (p ≤ 0.003) was found after the training intervention. No difference in number of responders between matched and non-matched groups was observed for any of the performance related variables (p ≥ 0.248). In recreational runners, prescribing PLT or DWT according to the global running pattern of individuals, in addition to endurance training, did not lead to greater improvements in RE.

Original languageEnglish
Article number631637
JournalFrontiers in Physiology
Volume12
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 17 Mar 2021

Keywords

  • concurrent training
  • dynamic weight training
  • plyometric training
  • running
  • sports biomechanics

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Physiology
  • Physiology (medical)

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