Cooling technique based on evaporation of thin and ultra thin liquid films

O. A. Kabov, E. Ya Gatapova, D. V. Zaitsev

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

9 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The fast development in semiconductor technology is leading to very high chip power dissipation and greater nonuniformity of on-chip power dissipation with the result of localized hot spots, often exceeding 1kW/cm2 in heat flux, which can degrade the microelectronics performance and reliability. Thin and very thin liquid films driven by a forced gas/vapor flow (stratified or annular flows), i.e. shear-driven liquid films in a narrow channel are promising candidate for an innovative cooling technique optimizing the tradeoffs between performance and cost. The paper focuses on the recent progress that has been achieved by the authors through conducting theory and experiment of locally heated shear-driven liquid films. Experiments with water and FC-72 in flat channels (height 0.3-2 mm) show that a liquid film driven by the action of a gas flow is stable in a wide range of liquid/gas flow rates. Maps of isothermal flow regimes were plotted and the lengths of smooth region were measured. Breakdown of liquid film was investigated and it was found that scenario of film breakdown differs widely for different flow regimes. The critical heat flux is about 10 times higher than that for a falling liquid film and exceeds 250 W/cm2 in experiments with water at atmospheric pressure. Procedures to organize a gas shear-driven liquid film flow under variable gravity conditions (parabolic flights) have been verified. It was found that the flow dynamics in normal gravity differs significantly from that in Microgravity. The film is wavier under low gravity conditions. The effect of slip at the wall and evaporation effect on liquid film dynamics and heat transfer was analyzed numerically. The macroscopic interface shape is found to be sensitive to slip length comparable with the initial film thickness. Calculations reveal that the maximum of the slip velocity is located in the transition region. All transport phenomena (convection to liquid and gas, evaporation) are found to be important for relatively thin films, and the thermal entry length is a determining factor for heaters of finite length. The thermal entry length depends on film thickness, which can be regulated by gas flow rate or channel height.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publication2008 11th IEEE Intersociety Conference on Thermal and Thermomechanical Phenomena in Electronic Systems, I-THERM
Pages520-527
Number of pages8
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 9 Sep 2008
Event2008 11th IEEE Intersociety Conference on Thermal and Thermomechanical Phenomena in Electronic Systems, I-THERM - Orlando,FL, United States
Duration: 28 May 200831 May 2008

Other

Other2008 11th IEEE Intersociety Conference on Thermal and Thermomechanical Phenomena in Electronic Systems, I-THERM
CountryUnited States
CityOrlando,FL
Period28.5.0831.5.08

Fingerprint

Liquid films
Evaporation
Cooling
Thin films
Flow of gases
Gravitation
Film thickness
Heat flux
Energy dissipation
Gases
Flow rate
Experiments
Microgravity
Liquids
Shear flow
Microelectronics
Atmospheric pressure
Water
Vapors
Semiconductor materials

Keywords

  • Critical heat flux
  • Evaporation
  • Flow regimes
  • Formation of dry patches
  • Liquid film
  • Narrow channel
  • Slip at the wall
  • Theory and experiment
  • Thermocapillary effect

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Control and Systems Engineering
  • Electrical and Electronic Engineering

Cite this

Kabov, O. A., Gatapova, E. Y., & Zaitsev, D. V. (2008). Cooling technique based on evaporation of thin and ultra thin liquid films. In 2008 11th IEEE Intersociety Conference on Thermal and Thermomechanical Phenomena in Electronic Systems, I-THERM (pp. 520-527). [4544312] https://doi.org/10.1109/ITHERM.2008.4544312

Cooling technique based on evaporation of thin and ultra thin liquid films. / Kabov, O. A.; Gatapova, E. Ya; Zaitsev, D. V.

2008 11th IEEE Intersociety Conference on Thermal and Thermomechanical Phenomena in Electronic Systems, I-THERM. 2008. p. 520-527 4544312.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Kabov, OA, Gatapova, EY & Zaitsev, DV 2008, Cooling technique based on evaporation of thin and ultra thin liquid films. in 2008 11th IEEE Intersociety Conference on Thermal and Thermomechanical Phenomena in Electronic Systems, I-THERM., 4544312, pp. 520-527, 2008 11th IEEE Intersociety Conference on Thermal and Thermomechanical Phenomena in Electronic Systems, I-THERM, Orlando,FL, United States, 28.5.08. https://doi.org/10.1109/ITHERM.2008.4544312
Kabov OA, Gatapova EY, Zaitsev DV. Cooling technique based on evaporation of thin and ultra thin liquid films. In 2008 11th IEEE Intersociety Conference on Thermal and Thermomechanical Phenomena in Electronic Systems, I-THERM. 2008. p. 520-527. 4544312 https://doi.org/10.1109/ITHERM.2008.4544312
Kabov, O. A. ; Gatapova, E. Ya ; Zaitsev, D. V. / Cooling technique based on evaporation of thin and ultra thin liquid films. 2008 11th IEEE Intersociety Conference on Thermal and Thermomechanical Phenomena in Electronic Systems, I-THERM. 2008. pp. 520-527
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