Computational multiscale toxicodynamic modeling of silver and carbon nanoparticle effects on mouse lung function

Dwaipayan Mukherjee, Danielle Botelho, Andrew J. Gow, Junfeng Zhang, Panos G. Georgopoulos

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

7 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

A computational, multiscale toxicodynamic model has been developed to quantify and predict pulmonary effects due to uptake of engineered nanomaterials (ENMs) in mice. The model consists of a collection of coupled toxicodynamic modules, that were independently developed and tested using information obtained from the literature. The modules were developed to describe the dynamics of tissue with explicit focus on the cells and the surfactant chemicals that regulate the process of breathing, as well as the response of the pulmonary system to xenobiotics. Alveolar type I and type II cells, and alveolar macrophages were included in the model, along with surfactant phospholipids and surfactant proteins, to account for processes occurring at multiple biological scales, coupling cellular and surfactant dynamics affected by nanoparticle exposure, and linking the effects to tissue-level lung function changes. Nanoparticle properties such as size, surface chemistry, and zeta potential were explicitly considered in modeling the interactions of these particles with biological media. The model predictions were compared with in vivo lung function response measurements in mice and analysis of mice lung lavage fluid following exposures to silver and carbon nanoparticles. The predictions were found to follow the trends of observed changes in mouse surfactant composition over 7 days post dosing, and are in good agreement with the observed changes in mouse lung function over the same period of time.

Original languageEnglish
Article numbere80917
JournalPLoS One
Volume8
Issue number12
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 3 Dec 2013
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

nanosilver
lung function
Silver
Surface-Active Agents
surfactants
Nanoparticles
Carbon
Lung
mice
lungs
nanoparticles
Chemical Phenomena
Tissue
nanomaterials
prediction
Nanostructures
Bronchoalveolar Lavage Fluid
Alveolar Macrophages
Xenobiotics
Zeta potential

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Agricultural and Biological Sciences(all)
  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)
  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Computational multiscale toxicodynamic modeling of silver and carbon nanoparticle effects on mouse lung function. / Mukherjee, Dwaipayan; Botelho, Danielle; Gow, Andrew J.; Zhang, Junfeng; Georgopoulos, Panos G.

In: PLoS One, Vol. 8, No. 12, e80917, 03.12.2013.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Mukherjee, Dwaipayan ; Botelho, Danielle ; Gow, Andrew J. ; Zhang, Junfeng ; Georgopoulos, Panos G. / Computational multiscale toxicodynamic modeling of silver and carbon nanoparticle effects on mouse lung function. In: PLoS One. 2013 ; Vol. 8, No. 12.
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