Compacting of highly dispersed ZrO2(Y2O3) powders

A. G. Burlachenko, Yu A. Mirovoy, A. V. Rygin, A. S. Buyakov, S. P. Buyakova

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Abstract

The highly dispersed ZrO2Y2O3 (3 mol. %) powder compaction process was studied at a pressure range from 20 to 300 MPa. The dependences of compacts volume, the average particle size and the relative density of the samples and the monoclinic phase amount of zirconia on the pressure value were studied. It was shown that the most intensive powder structural elements destruction occurred in the pressure range from 50 to 100 MPa. This is confirmed by zirconia powder monoclinic phase increasing diagram, which is not monotonous during pressing. The minimum particle size was 0.15 μm, which is three times less than in the initial powder, and achieved at the pressure value of 300 MPa.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationProceedings of the Advanced Materials with Hierarchical Structure for New Technologies and Reliable Structures
EditorsVasily M. Fomin, Victor E. Panin, Sergey G. Psakhie
PublisherAmerican Institute of Physics Inc.
Volume2051
ISBN (Electronic)9780735417779
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 12 Dec 2018
EventInternational Symposium on Hierarchical Materials: Development and Applications for New Technologies and Reliable Structures 2018 - Tomsk, Russian Federation
Duration: 1 Oct 20185 Oct 2018

Conference

ConferenceInternational Symposium on Hierarchical Materials: Development and Applications for New Technologies and Reliable Structures 2018
CountryRussian Federation
CityTomsk
Period1.10.185.10.18

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ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Physics and Astronomy(all)

Cite this

Burlachenko, A. G., Mirovoy, Y. A., Rygin, A. V., Buyakov, A. S., & Buyakova, S. P. (2018). Compacting of highly dispersed ZrO2(Y2O3) powders. In V. M. Fomin, V. E. Panin, & S. G. Psakhie (Eds.), Proceedings of the Advanced Materials with Hierarchical Structure for New Technologies and Reliable Structures (Vol. 2051). [020045] American Institute of Physics Inc.. https://doi.org/10.1063/1.5083288