Adsorption of surfactant protein D from human respiratory secretions by carbon nanotubes and polystyrene nanoparticles depends on nanomaterial surface modification and size

Magda Marchetti, Milo S P Shaffer, Martina Zambianchi, Shu Chen, Fabiana Superti, Stephan Schwander, Andrew Gow, Junfeng Jim Zhang, Kian Fan Chung, Mary P. Ryan, Alexandra E. Porter, Teresa D. Tetley

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

9 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The alveolar respiratory unit constitutes one of the main targets of inhaled nano-particles; the effect of engineered nanomaterials NMs on human health is largely unknown. Surfactant protein D SP-D is synthesized by alveolar type II epithelial cells and released into respiratory secretions; its main function is in immune defence, notably against inhaled microbes. SP-D also plays an important role in modulating an appropriate inflammatory response in the lung, and reduced SP-D is associated with a number of inflammatory lung diseases. Adsorption of SP-D to inhaled NMs may facilitate their removal via macrophage phagocytosis. This study addresses the hypothesis that the chemistry, size and surface modification of engineered NMs will impact on their interaction with, and adsorption of, SP-D. To this purpose, we have examined the interactions between SP-D in human lung lavage and two NMs, carbon nanotubes and polystyrene nanoparticles, with different surface functionalization. We have demonstrated that particle size, functionalization and concentration affect the adsorption of SP-D from human lung lavage. Functionalization with negatively charged groups enhanced the amount of SP-D binding. While SP-D binding would be expected to enhance macrophage phagocytosis, these results suggest that the degree of binding is markedly affected by the physicochemistry of the NM and that deposition of high levels of some nanoparticles within the alveolar unit might deplete SP-D levels and affect alveolar immune defence mechanisms.

Original languageEnglish
Article number20140038
JournalPhilosophical Transactions of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences
Volume370
Issue number1661
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 5 Jan 2015
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Pulmonary Surfactant-Associated Protein D
carbon nanotubes
nanomaterials
Carbon Nanotubes
Nanostructures
Polystyrenes
polystyrenes
nanoparticles
Nanostructured materials
surfactants
Nanoparticles
Adsorption
Surface treatment
adsorption
lungs
secretion
phagocytosis
macrophages
proteins
defense mechanisms

Keywords

  • Carbon nanotubes
  • Lung
  • Polystyrene nanoparticles
  • Surfactant protein D adsorption

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Agricultural and Biological Sciences(all)
  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)

Cite this

Adsorption of surfactant protein D from human respiratory secretions by carbon nanotubes and polystyrene nanoparticles depends on nanomaterial surface modification and size. / Marchetti, Magda; Shaffer, Milo S P; Zambianchi, Martina; Chen, Shu; Superti, Fabiana; Schwander, Stephan; Gow, Andrew; Zhang, Junfeng Jim; Chung, Kian Fan; Ryan, Mary P.; Porter, Alexandra E.; Tetley, Teresa D.

In: Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences, Vol. 370, No. 1661, 20140038, 05.01.2015.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Marchetti, Magda ; Shaffer, Milo S P ; Zambianchi, Martina ; Chen, Shu ; Superti, Fabiana ; Schwander, Stephan ; Gow, Andrew ; Zhang, Junfeng Jim ; Chung, Kian Fan ; Ryan, Mary P. ; Porter, Alexandra E. ; Tetley, Teresa D. / Adsorption of surfactant protein D from human respiratory secretions by carbon nanotubes and polystyrene nanoparticles depends on nanomaterial surface modification and size. In: Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences. 2015 ; Vol. 370, No. 1661.
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