A. G. Stromberg

First class scientist, second class citizen: Letters from the GULAG and a history of electroanalysis in the USSR

Richard Guy Compton, Alexander S. Kabakaev, Michael T. Stawpert, Gregory George Wildgoose, Elza A. Zakharova

    Research output: Book/ReportBook

    2 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    Armin G. Stromberg was arguably one of the founding fathers of the technique of stripping voltammetry frequently used in chemical analysis, yet he is virtually unheard of in Western scientific circles. He was a brilliant scientist, but due to his German ancestry he was interred in one of the NKVD GULAG camps at the outbreak of the Second World War. This semi-biographical history presents the complete set of 74 surviving letters written by Stromberg to his wife during this period. The letters provide both historians and the interested public with a rare and unique glimpse into the everyday living conditions of inmates in one of the GULAG labour camps. The book also traces Stromberg's life following his release. More importantly, it relates how he founded the thriving Tomsk school to the wider historical context of electroanalysis in the USSR, drawing conclusions about the rate of scientific development as compared to the West and showing how ‘wet analysis’ remained of vital importance to industry long after equivalent measurements were made elsewhere. Readers will also appreciate how Stromberg's invaluable contributions in the Tomsk School of Electroanalysis laid the foundations for the extensive metallurgical extraction and nuclear industries that dominated the entire Siberian region for many years. This book is a must-read for anyone interested in the life and times of an important, yet often overlooked scientist of the Second World War.

    Original languageEnglish
    PublisherImperial College Press
    Number of pages363
    ISBN (Print)9781848166769, 9781848166752
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 1 Jan 2011

    Fingerprint

    Armin
    Nuclear industry
    Voltammetry
    Personnel
    Chemical analysis
    Industry
    History
    Letters

    ASJC Scopus subject areas

    • Arts and Humanities(all)
    • Chemistry(all)

    Cite this

    Compton, R. G., Kabakaev, A. S., Stawpert, M. T., Wildgoose, G. G., & Zakharova, E. A. (2011). A. G. Stromberg: First class scientist, second class citizen: Letters from the GULAG and a history of electroanalysis in the USSR. Imperial College Press. https://doi.org/10.1142/P766

    A. G. Stromberg : First class scientist, second class citizen: Letters from the GULAG and a history of electroanalysis in the USSR. / Compton, Richard Guy; Kabakaev, Alexander S.; Stawpert, Michael T.; Wildgoose, Gregory George; Zakharova, Elza A.

    Imperial College Press, 2011. 363 p.

    Research output: Book/ReportBook

    Compton RG, Kabakaev AS, Stawpert MT, Wildgoose GG, Zakharova EA. A. G. Stromberg: First class scientist, second class citizen: Letters from the GULAG and a history of electroanalysis in the USSR. Imperial College Press, 2011. 363 p. https://doi.org/10.1142/P766
    Compton, Richard Guy ; Kabakaev, Alexander S. ; Stawpert, Michael T. ; Wildgoose, Gregory George ; Zakharova, Elza A. / A. G. Stromberg : First class scientist, second class citizen: Letters from the GULAG and a history of electroanalysis in the USSR. Imperial College Press, 2011. 363 p.
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